Defending intellectual property, the ground war

Posted: August 9, 2010 by chrisbagley in F3 Technologies, FargoTube, Uncategorized
Tags: , , , ,

Yesterday’s New York Times Magazine had a fascinating, fascinating article about performance rights organizations, which enforce music copyrights.

The article followed Devon Baker, a field agent for BMI, one of the three largest PROs in the United States, as she trekked across the Arizona desert in an effort to wring a few hundred dollars a year from bar after cafe after strip club. I guess you could call her a soldier in the ground war over intellectual property.

Up until yesterday, I had never wondered how many proprietors are out there buying CDs for $9.95 from Amazon and then playing them while selling $2.95 bottles of Bud Light, but I’ll bet it’s a lot, and BMI’s agents are apparently trying to find and charge all of them. It looks like an awfully tough slog.

BMI (Broadcast Music, Inc.) is organized like a nonprofit, and a representative told the magazine that it gives musicians and record labels 89 percent of the fees it collects on their behalf, after subtracting 11 percent for its own costs, including the salaries of Baker and other field agents. BMI employs several hundred agents like her and claims about $1 billion in royalty revenue each year, according to the article. I’m guessing that the other two majors, ASCAP and SESAC, are comparable in size. (The two names are acronyms for the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers and the Society of European Stage Authors and Composers, but all three organizations are equally focused on U.S. copyright law).

We at F3 Technologies have been looking at PROs because their mission is complementary and so similar to that of our FargoTube video and entertainment service: helping artists and content owners to regain control over their creations.

There are differences, of course: Whereas Devon Baker begins collecting revenue from heretofore illegal use, FargoTube is a completely new type of platform that can bring new fans to content owners while allowing artists to connect with existing fans more richly.

By “richly,” I mean more profitably, but also through richer content: FargoTube accommodates music, high-definition still images and videos, including exclusive interviews, short video messages, music videos, and movie-length features. And FargoTube is built like a social network, so fans of a particular artist can interact with each other, share videos subject to the artist’s approval, and get information about upcoming tours.

My favorite difference between PROs and FargoTube: F3 employees don’t have to negotiate with screaming bar owners in dusty parking lots.

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Comments
  1. jacque kimbro says:

    Fargo Tube sounds great and all, but I got the website and zilch. Where’s the content? Where’s the interest?

  2. chrisbagley says:

    We don’t expect FargoTube to be a user-driven medium like YouTube, especially not before we get a critical mass of artists uploading their content. We have signed one record label as a content partner and are working hard on several fronts to sign additional content owners as partners. Please keep your eyes peeled in the next few days.

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